Thursday, May 24, 2018

Stay and Walk Sydney’s historic Tank Stream

Sydney’s newest international hotel, The Tank Stream, is offering visitors to Sydney an opportunity to combine contemporary comfort with accommodation – with a stay that includes a historical discovery tour.

The tour traces the path of the city’s original life-source, the Tank Stream.

When the First Fleet arrived in 1788, it was meant to have established the colony at Botany Bay, but the lack of fresh water saw Captain Arthur Phillip move the fleet around to Sydney Cove, where they discovered a fresh water stream – and the city of Sydney was born.

The stream in those days was open, running from a swamp in Hyde Park, down through waterfalls across Bridge Street then out to what is now Circular Quay. Tanks were established to capture the water, leading to its name, the Tank Stream.

The Tank Stream is now fully covered, but a Tank Stream & Hidden Laneways tour – conducted by small-group tour specialists Go Local Tours – provides visitors the opportunity to retrace its path covering the city’s infamous start as a penal colony, the beautiful sandstone architecture, and the colourful stories behind the laneways that lead from Martin Place down to Sydney Harbour.

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