Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Which holiday habit is losing Australia $280 million?

Most Aussies formulate escape plans at their work desks, a new survey has found.

Finder.com.au surveyed more than 2000 Australians and discovered that the typical employee spends an average of 57 minutes a week planning and booking holidays instead of working.

Which adds up to 7.6 million hours in lost productivity as Australian employees hunt for hotels, browse for beaches and fossick for flights online every week.

Some 64 per cent of workers admit to browsing holiday options on their boss’s time, in a habit costing Aussie businesses an estimated $280.8 million in wages each week.

Men are worse than women, according to the survey, with 67 percent admitting to organising their holidays while on the job as opposed to 61 percent of women.

And women spend less time during the work week planning holidays, averaging 50 minutes, while men average 64 minutes.

Tasmanian workers are the most productive, with 41 per cent of employees saying they never plan holidays during work time, compared to just 28 per cent of those in Western Australia.

“Perhaps it’s because it’s all too easy to be distracted by two-for-one airfare deals and other sales that are coming straight to your inbox – and these are often announced during work hours,” said Angus Kidman of Finder.com.

“But five or ten minutes here and there adds up, and employees need to be researching or booking travel during breaks if they want to avoid an awkward meeting with HR down the line.”

Kidman says workers should put their phones on flight mode to reduce notifications and distracting pop-ups.

“From travel news to bucket-list destinations plastered on social media, the tourism industry has certainly benefited from consumers being online more,” he said.

“But researching travel plans for up to four hours a month during work hours is taking it a bit far.”

 

About Kate Jackson

Kate Jackson
Kate Jackson is the editor of Accomnews. You can reach her at any time with questions or submissions: [email protected]

Check Also

Will ‘digital strip searches’ damage New Zealand’s brand?

A new law allowing Kiwi customs officers to perform ‘digital strip searches’ has hit headlines around the world and prompted social media users to swear off visits to New Zealand.

Sydney’s new cool led by ground-breaking hotels

Not since before the 2000 Olympics has the city seen a fervour of hotel building and renovation - and this time around, the newbies are all decidedly different.

Home invasion: Marriott embraces share economy

Marriott International is further blurring the lines between homeshares and hotels with the announcement it will expand its London homesharing pilot to encompass Paris, Rome and Lisbon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *