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Saturday, March 25, 2017
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Wily Irish Mammy is back! with some more handy cleaning tips…

About high humidity…

Ireland gets up to 225 days of rain a year and it experiences humid summers therefore Irish Mammy knows a thing or two about rain and indeed high humidity. She knows that your guests’ personal discomfort will be effected because when it is too hot and humid, bodies are less efficient at releasing heat, which means they sweat and are uncomfortable.

Guest discomfort is the least of your worries though! All sorts of microscopic organisms that can harm public health love humid environments, mildew and mould spores thrive in it and this can be highly toxic. If mould is visible, you certainly have a problem but even if there are no signs, mould and mildew can still spread throughout the vents, or behind walls.

Dust mites also love humidity, and these can be dangerous for people who suffer from asthma and allergies. Asthma sufferers experience more frequent attacks in more humid environments and people get sicker more often in places that have mould and mildew.

The health and safety of a property can be compromised too, extreme humidity can effect woodwork, causing floorboards to creak and bend and paint to peel. Stuffy, mouldy smells are also off-putting to your guests and all of this can cost you money to repair and eliminate.

Minimising humidity and the prevention of mould and mildew will save you money and provide a comfortable and a non-toxic space for your guests to enjoy their stay. Ideal indoor humidity should be between 30 and 60 percent, measure this with a moisture meter.

“Have you no coat?” Irish Mammy’s sixth sense for rain is spot on. She doesn’t need a fancy phone or a weather app, and she wouldn’t know how to use one anyway, “How do you work this yoke?” But Mammy certainly knows how to clean…

  • Humidity? It’s no problem to Irish Mammy, just add a cupful of Borax (also known as, Sodium Borate or Sodium Tetraborate) to soapy water whenever you wash down walls. Alternatively, mix 1/2 cup borax with 1/2 cup vinegar and one cup water in a spray bottle and spray generously on mouldy surfaces before wiping clean with a damp sponge.
  • Tackle wet areas immediately – clean up a spill or flood right away and remove the risk of it happening again if you can.
  • Keep your gutters clean!
  • “Is that a draught? You will catch your death!” But, when it comes to reducing humidity, Irish Mammy knows that good ventilation is essential. So make sure that you clean your vents and extractors regularly and service them so that they are working well.
  • Bathrooms need to be thoroughly waterproofed and seals spotlessly clean. Clean your seals with vinegar, use a toothbrush to remove the mould but if it is too deeply ingrained you may need to replace the seal.
  • To keep your soft furnishings mould-free, sprinkle baking soda on carpets, rugs and upholstery, leave for 30 minutes to soak up the moisture and then vacuum.
  • For steamy bathrooms with no windows, encourage your guests to have shorter showers (also better for the environment) but also make sure that you have effective extractors and fans to keep the air circulating.
  • If you are in a high humidity area and it is an affordable option, consider a dehumidifier as an investment.

 

Send wily Irish Mammy your housekeeping queries, keep her on her toes and the top of her cleaning game!

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